View & Print Coupons
  • |
  • |
Email A Friend
Please insert a friend's information that you would like send an email to.
Friend's Email Address:
Friend's Name:
Your Email Address:
Your Name:
Special Message:
Print Page

Whether you are new to raising chicks and caring for poultry or are a seasoned farmer - these terms can be very helpful when you have questions for fellow farmers, hatcheries or contacts at Southern States who can help answer your questions. They can also be great terms to teach your children or younger farming friends who are interested in learning more about flock management.

Be sure to download our free Poultry Pal Pro mobile app today to connect with fellow poultry owners!

Poultry Terms - Quick Reference List:

Bantam: A miniature chicken, about one-fourth the size of a regular chicken.

Biddy: Another term for chicks or baby chickens.

Brooder or brooder box: A heated enclosure for raising chicks. Protects chicks from drafts and predators and provides access to food and water.

Brooding period: The stage of life between hatch and adulthood. Usually lasts from the first eight to 10 weeks of life.

Broody hen: A hen that wants to sit on eggs to hatch them and brood chicks.

Chick tooth: Sharp end of a chick's beak used to poke a hole in the egg's shell during hatching. Also known as an egg tooth.

Clutch: A group of eggs, usually about 12. Term is commonly used with a group of eggs being sat on, or incubated, by a brooding hen.

Coccidiosis: Disease of fowl caused by a microscopic protozoa that causes diarrhea, unthriftiness or death. Occurs most frequently in chicks older than three weeks and in young adults. Transmitted by chicken waste. Prevented by many commercially available coccidiostats that can be added to feed.

Cockerel: A male chicken under one year of age. Also called a young rooster.

Comb: The fleshy, red-colored growth on top of a chicken's head.

CRD: Chronic Respiratory Disease, a common disease of chickens that is characterized by sneezing and difficulty breathing. Commonly controlled with antibiotics usually administered in feed or drinking water.

Down: Soft, fine feathers on chicks.

Dusting or dust bath: Common chicken behavior of bathing with dirt in a dusty shallow depression to rid themselves of mites and parasites.

Fount: A water fountain or watering device for chicken.

Gizzard: Internal chicken organ that crushes food with the help of pebbles or grit.

Grower feed: Commercially available feed formulated for adolescent, growing chickens. Usually used from nine to 20 weeks.

Hen: An adult female chicken over one year of age.

Incubator: An artificially heated container that simulates the environment for hatching eggs. Forced-air incubators have a fan to circulate the air. In a still-air incubator the air is not circulated mechanically. Incubator temperatures vary from 99 degrees to 103 degrees. According to University of Illinois poultry experts, 100.5 degrees is optimum for a still-air incubator.

Layers: Mature female chickens kept for egg production. Also known as laying hens.

Laying feed: Commercially available feed formulated for laying hens. Usually given to chickens beginning at 20 weeks of age.

Picking: Detrimental activity of chickens picking at each other's feathers.

Pullet: A female chicken under one year of age.

Rooster: An adult male chicken.

Scratch: A type of feed that can consist of cracked corn and different types of whole grains. Often fed as a treat for backyard chickens and not used as a main food source.

Starter feed: Pre-mixed commercial food for chicks, commonly available at feed or farm stores. According to University of Florida animal science experts, starter feeds usually contain about 20 percent crude protein and the vitamins and minerals needed by chicks. These feeds usually are also medicated. Should be fed to chicks for the first six to eight weeks of life.

Straight-run chicks: Chicks that have not been separated according to sexes. Chicks that have been separated are known as sexed chickens.

Have questions? Please reach out to your local Southern States team!

Email A Friend
Please insert a friend's information that you would like send an email to.
Friend's Email Address:
Friend's Name:
Your Email Address:
Your Name:
Special Message:
Print Page

Do you think you might need an herbicide application this fall? Before you take action, determine what type of fall application offers the best solution for your field with the help of Southern States.

  1. Scout regularly. Scouting a field is the most important thing you can do after harvest to control weeds. Scouting early and often allows you to see what survived the season and lets you control problems early.
  2. Know your field history. Looking back at your field records can help with controlling weeds in the future. From a field history you can determine what weeds have been a problem, what herbicides were applied in the past and how well they worked. You can also prevent herbicide resistance by avoiding repeated application of products with the same mode of action.

  3. Identify your problem. Correctly identifying weeds is key to weed control and elimination, says Southern States Agronomist Jim Riddell. “After you find out what kind of weed you are dealing with, you can then determine when it is most susceptible to control,” Riddell says. “You want to catch and treat the weeds at the right time.”

  4. Consider future crops. What are your plans for the field and how would a herbicide application impact them?

Riddell advises close adherence to any restrictions on the product’s label. “Small grains and cover crops can be damaged by residual herbicides, so if you plan on planting them right after harvest, you’ll want to take that into consideration before doing a fall herbicide application."

For more information on fall herbicide applications, please see our full article. How have you handled a fall application? What did you look at beforehand? Share with fellow growers below!

Email A Friend
Please insert a friend's information that you would like send an email to.
Friend's Email Address:
Friend's Name:
Your Email Address:
Your Name:
Special Message:
Print Page

Flies in your dairy barn are more than just a nuisance to cows and humans. Negative economic impacts result as flies can reduce milk production when cows expend extra energy fending off flies, cause poor general health, increase vet bills as flies transmit disease from cow to cow, contaminate milk and reduce worker productivity if they are swarmed when milking and feeding. These winged pests can also delay the entry of replacement heifers into the lactating herd, thus reducing their lifetime milk production performance.

House flies and stable flies are the two fly varieties most associated with dairy buildings. Gone are the days of simply spraying a pesticide and hoping the flies die off. Today, the most successful way to combat unwanted fly populations is through integrated pest management (IPM). IPM seeks to maximize the effectiveness of pest control while at the same time minimizing pesticide use and conserving beneficial insects that prey on flies. With IPM one must first identify which pests are the problems, then stay on top of monitoring the results of the IPM program.

Proper Sanitation

A proper sanitation/waste management routine is the cornerstone of any pest management program. Not only is it the most effective way to rid your facility of flies, it's the most economical way. Pesticides cannot be expected to eradicate flies when sanitation efforts are poor. On average, the fly life cycle lasts anywhere from 10 to 21 days. If you clean your barn on a weekly basis, you can break the fly life cycle. Each week you should remove or spread fly breeding materials including manure, spilled silage, moist hay, wet grain, etc. Areas to focus on cleaning include calf hutches, holding pens, loafing sheds, paths to milking parlors and stalls.

Milk Room

It is vital to maintain a fly free zone in your milk room. Use extreme caution when applying pesticides in milk rooms to avoid illegal residues in milk. If you must use pesticides, check with your milk inspector prior to usage and make sure to cover or remove milk and associated implements prior to spraying.

Non-chemical fly control methods are generally preferred. Installation of tightly closed screen doors and windows leading to the milk room can significantly reduce the number of flies able to enter the area. Sticky tapes and light traps can be used to catch those flies that are able to sneak in through the screening.

Early & Often

The key to controlling flies in your dairy barn is to begin fly control preparation in early spring before temperatures start to rise and fly breeding season begins. The earlier you act, the less likely you are to have a large fly population. Likewise, a consistent sanitation program will allow you to prevent a large number of flies from invading your facility. Need some help developing a comprehensive fly control program for your dairy? Visit your local Southern States store today.

Follow Us

Subscribe to our email newsletter to receive updates and special promotions from Southern States

Your Current Store:

You will see pricing and specials based on this store.