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Using Flowering Vines


Take advantage of all that vertical space in your garden! Most American gardens are too focused at ground level, with plants no more than 3 or 4 feet high. Flowering vines are easy to grow and can do so much for your landscape. Most require very little maintenance and need only a little pruning now and then.

Need to disguise something in a yard? Maybe it’s a rusty metal garden shed, an old stump needing camouflage or a desire for more privacy around the patio area. Let flowering vines create the screening needed while adding walls of vertical show stopping and fragrant blooms.

Vines can also create focal points and accents in a landscape. They can scramble up nearly anything that will support them. Plant a honeysuckle where it can cling to the posts of the front porch or stoop and enjoy heady fragrance every morning and evening. Plant a clematis under the mailbox and let the vine climb up your mailbox post for a burst of color at the end of the driveway. Place a column support in the center of a flower bed and train a vine to take center stage and add depth and height.

Another great use of flowering vines is to help define garden "rooms". Different areas of a yard can be separated into garden rooms by color of bloom or type of plant. Arbors, arches, trellises and pergolas add architectural elements to the garden. This creates interest and the feeling of being enveloped in an environment. Use archways and arbors to separate the flower beds from the vegetable garden. Perhaps one garden room is filled entirely with roses. An archway teeming with black-eyed-susan vine (Thunbergia alata) would set them off beautifully.

Many flowering vines like morning glories (ipomoea) and cup and saucer vine (Cobaea scandens) are annuals easily grown from seeds in the spring. Others such as the clematis, honeysuckles (Lonicera periclymenum)and passion flowers (Passiflora caerulea) are perennials and will return year after year. Some vines get quite large and require heavy-duty supports while others thrive in containers with a small trellis to climb on.

When choosing a vine, pay careful attention to its light requirements and the strength of the support it will need. Be sure to note the direction in which it twines. Some vines twine around their support in a clockwise directions and others twine counterclockwise. This will aid in training the vine to its support.

The blossoms of flowering vines come in an infinite array of sizes, colors, shapes and fragrances. Your local Southern States dealer can suggest the plants and seeds that are best suited to your area.

 


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